Why Hoverboards Are Dangerous

January 2, 2016
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Hoverboards – probably the most popular Christmas gift this year but probably not the safest. Besides the number of emergency room injuries due to falls and collisions, Amazon has recently urged buyers of hoverboards to dispose of them as they may be exposed to fire risks. There have been actual reports of hoverboards literally exploding into flames, some even in public places. The rapid increase in hoverboard-related fires has the Federal Consumer Product Safety Commission investigating 16 fires linked to hoverboards in twelve states.

 

Due to the sudden surge in reported hoverboard fires, major American airlines are telling travellers not to pack them in their luggage and stores across the country are telling customers that they can’t cruise the aisles on these self-balancing scooters.

The problem seems to be linked to the lithium-ion batteries which can present fire problems. “In rare cases, these batteries can overheat, catch fire, or explode,” states Amazon’s safety page.

It’s not yet clear how to stop your hoverboard from catching on fire, though. Some have burst into flames while plugged into walls, while others have gone up while actively in use. However, if you do insist on buying or using one, here are a few tips to ensure you and/or your child are safe:

  1. The only answer to fires and even crashes is CONSTANT vigilance.
  2. Do not charge a hoverboard overnight. Make sure you’re awake and keeping an eye on it.
  3. Charge and store it in an open and dry area, away from items which can catch fire.
  4. If you buying one as a gift, do not charge it before wrapping it.
  5. Do not overload electrical circuits,especially when your Hoverboard is plugged in!
  6. Avoid buying a hoverboard at a location, like a mall kiosk, or on an online store that does not carry information about who is selling the product and how they can be contacted if a problem should arise. If you do not think you could find the seller again, were a problem to arise with your board that should be a warning for you not to do business with them.
  7. Look for an indication of a certified national testing laboratory. The absence of such a mark means your safety is likely not a priority for that manufacturer.

As of 12/30/15, there is still no definitive list of which hoverboards have been recalled. The Consumer Product Safety Commission’s website will be posting brands of offending hoverboards as soon as they know them. We will update the page here as soon as we know them.

Via YouTube

One Comment

  1. jaden

    November 17, 2017 at 5:27 pm

    they can be very dangerous for people over 7 years old.

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